Why You Should Send Flowers To Open Source Developers

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You are probably thinking flowers are dumb: they die and they don’t do anything; they are for dates, weddings and funerals. Besides, open source developers do not need flowers, they need money. But nobody wants to pay for software, let alone open source software. Even though today open source software is as vital as roads and bridges, nobody wants to pay to maintain it.

So by all means let’s figure out a way to get more money for open source developers. But in the meantime, here’s why you should still send flowers.

  1. Flowers show appreciation

Taskwarrior share some great lessons learnt for open source maintainers. This includes cautionary tales like: “People will pick a fight with you about all your incidental choices. Your issue tracker, your branching strategy, your version numbers, the text editor you use, and so on.” Open source developers are a tough bunch, but are still likely to suffer from burnout. Sending flowers is the ultimate gesture of positivity and understanding. Plus there is all sorts of research out there that suggests flowers & plants improve mood and promote creativity in the workplace.

  1. People think you are more capable & emotionally intelligent

If altruistic reasons are not enough, then consider this. The act of giving flowers has benefits for the giver. The act of giving makes people happy. There is also research that says people who send flower are perceived as having higher emotional intelligence, capable and courageous.

  1. You will be a better leader

Small things can make all the difference. This idea is partly inspired by my favourite blogger, who wrote about the effect receiving flowers from Marc Benioff, CEO of Salesforce had on her. Basically really good leaders are always thinking of thoughtful ways to get the best out of everybody.

OK so now I have a confession to make. Maybe I am telling you this because Kichwa Coders have recently joined the realm of open source maintainers, heading up and contributing to the January project  (numpy & datastructures for Java). And we are gearing up, together with the rest of the Eclipse Science Working Group, for our first major science release. It is an amazing project that will provide tool infrastructure for countless scientific projects. So it will be awesome, but there is still some trepidation when you cross the threshold from open source user to open source maintainer. It is a little bit like how when you have your own kids, you finally really appreciate your parents and wonder how they did it. Right now I am in awe of open source leads and maintainers everywhere. So just do it. Send flowers to open source developers. And while you’re at it, send some to your parents too.

“Hello World!” – One Small Step for Python Scripting in Eclipse

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We are excited to be able to run a ‘hello world’ command using EASE and CPython in Eclipse (quickly followed by running the ‘Zen of Python’ for good measure :). It is the first key stage of proving our approach of using Py4J as the enabling technology to getting scripting available with EASE for Eclipse. It is a small step, but a significant leap towards unprecedented automation, dramatically easier Eclipse extensions and powerful third-party library integration using Python. Continue reading ““Hello World!” – One Small Step for Python Scripting in Eclipse”

Kichwa Coders Join Eclipse Science Working Group Steering Committee

Kichwa Coders is pleased to announce that we have become a member of the Steering Committee of the Eclipse Science Working Group. Kichwa has been an active member of the Science Working Group from the beginning and its involvement includes:

  • Leading projects related to Python scripting in Eclipse EASE
  • Organizing Eclipse community meetups in London (join us for our next one!)
  • Jonah Graham is project co-lead for the January Project for common data structures.
  • Tracy Miranda is on the Program Committee promoting the Science track for Eclipsecon France

Tracy Miranda will represent Kichwa Coders as the Steering Committee participant. The current Steering Committee is made up of members from IBM, Diamond Light Source, Oakridge National Labs and Itema. Kichwa Coders look forward to working closely with other Steering Committee members to shape the future direction of the group and encourage other organizations to participate in this vibrant ecosystem where advancing open-source software advances science.

Introducing Project January

A new project proposal from the Eclipse Science Working Group (SWG) goes live. Project January aims to provide a set of standardized Java-based numerical data structures for scientific computing. Scientific tools are rapidly scaling to meet the increasing demands of the user both in sheer volumes of data as well as complexity. Back at a site meeting in Trondheim, the SWG members agreed a generic dataset that would promote tool integration was one of the key priorities of the group. In the short-term, this looks a lot like “numpy for Java”. That in itself is a pretty big deal, but the future plans are equally exciting, check out the proposal here.

As for the name, project January works on many levels. Besides being the month the project proposal goes live, it is also an acronym: JAva NUmerical ARraYs :-). The month January is named after the Roman god Janus, god of new beginnings and doorways. Project January is a foundational building block of scientific computing and certainly a doorway to greater collaboration and tool integration within the Eclipse community and beyond.

Tremendous Tech in Trondheim

Trondheim is tiny – at least to someone who lives in the shadow of London. So it was eye-opening for me, over four short days, to immerse myself in the fully formed tech scene of a region with a population 2% of that of London’s.

Ocean Space Research at Marintek

Ocean Space – I’d never heard the term before so it took me a moment to understand, that as opposed to outer space, this refers to the vast unexplored regions below the sea-line which we know less about than the surface of the moon. This is the heart of what Marintek do, and they were the hosts for the science working group meeting I was there for, but more about that later. The work done at Marintek is fascinating, but I will limit it to my 3 highlights:

  • Ocean labs and  towing tanks are used for simulating conditions at sea, for example, oil rigs in the ocean. Yes the tanks are bigger than swimming pools. Yes they could generate all sorts of waves. No we couldn’t swim in them (or take selfies for that matter).
  • Floating wind turbines –  I heard about them first here – harnessing wind power in the deep sea, amazing!
  • Cavitation tunnels – first the science lesson: air bubbles under pressure actually boil at low temperatures, causing implosions aka cavitation – how great is that? So great, I’m linking to this video again so you don’t miss it.   Well, actually it’s not so great for badly designed propellers. Luckily this can all be tested for in a cavitation tunnel.

The icing on the cake for the visit was hearing about the plans for a bigger and better ocean space centre,  opening in 2020 (assuming the politics all works out as planned). Who knows what else the great depths have to offer mankind?

Continue reading “Tremendous Tech in Trondheim”